The Only Thing to Fear

by Margaret Lukens, New Leaf + Company

My plans for 2009, and the nation’s plans for the inauguration of President-elect Obama, have sent me back to past inaugural themes. While the planners in Washington have chosen to sound the keynote from Lincoln’s inaugural address, “a new birth of freedom”, it is another one, Franklin Roosevelt’s first inaugural address fromĀ  1933, thatĀ  has particular power to stir me to reach for my highest in difficult times. As we again welcome a new administration that inherits a sputtering economy, it seems especially timely .

FDR's first inaugual
FDR's first inaugual

You can hear President Roosevelt’s entire 1933 inaugural address at www.americanrhetoric.com, a treasure trove of great recordings. Below is an excerpt which sounds themes that seem written for today:

“….This is preeminently the time to speak the truth, the whole truth, frankly and boldly. Nor need we shrink from honestly facing conditions in our country today. This great Nation will endure, as it has endured, will revive and will prosper.

So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life, a leadership of frankness and of vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory. And I am convinced that you will again give that support to leadership in these critical days.

In such a spirit on my part and on yours we face our common difficulties. They concern, thank God, only material things. Values have shrunk to fantastic levels; taxes have risen; our ability to pay has fallen; government of all kinds is faced by serious curtailment of income; the means of exchange are frozen in the currents of trade; the withered leaves of industrial enterprise lie on every side; farmers find no markets for their produce; and the savings of many years in thousands of families are gone. More important, a host of unemployed citizens face the grim problem of existence, and an equally great number toil with little return. Only a foolish optimist can deny the dark realities of the moment.

And yet our distress comes from no failure of substance. We are stricken by no plague of locusts. Compared with the perils which our forefathers conquered, because they believed and were not afraid, we have still much to be thankful for. Nature still offers her bounty and human efforts have multiplied it. Plenty is at our doorstep, but a generous use of it languishes in the very sight of the supply….

Happiness lies not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort. The joy, the moral stimulation of work no longer must be forgotten in the mad chase of evanescent profits. These dark days, my friends, will be worth all they cost us if they teach us that our true destiny is not to be ministered unto but to minister to ourselves, to our fellow men.”

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